Driving Offence Codes

See below for all the driving licence offence codes used in the UK by the DVLA along with detailed information about each driving offence type.

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Accident Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
AC10  Failing to stop after an accident  5-10
AC20  Failing to give particulars or to report an accident within 24 hours  5-10
AC30  Undefined accident offences  4-9

Offence codes AC10, AC20 & AC30 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

AC10 – Failing to stop after an accident

If, while driving a vehicle, you are involved in an accident, you are legally obliged to stop. Furthermore, if anyone involved has reasonable grounds for requesting your name, address and vehicle registration, these must be provided and if you do not own the vehicle you are driving, you must also provide the name and address of the owner.

It is not necessary to wait around indefinitely and you are also not required to enquire as to whether anyone is entitled to the above information. However, if you do not stop, you will be guilty of failing to stop after an accident, an offence identified by the DVLA endorsement code AC10.

The AC10 offence will lead to a 5-10 point endorsement on your driving licence which will remain for four years. A disqualification from driving is discretionary and the maximum penalty is a level five fine and/or six months’ imprisonment.

Failing to stop after an accident and Patterson Law

You have a defence if you can show that you did not realise an accident had occurred. These offences most commonly occur in supermarket car parks.

If you have been accused of failing to stop after an accident then contact us via the website or call 01626 359800 to ask for specific advice about the best way forward. We are often able to persuade the police not to take further action in relation to these matters.

More about failing to stop & failing to report accidents

Fail to Report FAQ’s

Fail To Stop FAQ’s

AC20 – Failing to give particulars or to report an accident within 24 hours

If you are involved in an accident while driving, you are legally required to stop and give your name, address and vehicle registration to anyone who has reasonable cause to request such information. If you fail to do so, you must instead report the accident at a police station or to a police constable, in person, as soon as possible.

If you do not do this within 24 hours of an accident occurring – providing your insurance certificate within seven days as well – you will be guilty of failing to give particulars or to report an accident within 24 hours, which is identified by the DVLA endorsement code AC20.

The AC20 offence will lead to a 5-10 point endorsement on your driving licence which will remain for four years. A disqualification from driving is discretionary and the maximum penalty is a level five fine and/or six months’ imprisonment.

Talk to Patterson law about the specifics of any allegation. We are sometimes able to persuade the local police not to take any further actions before issuing a summons to court.

Call 01626 359800 if you want to have a chat about the best way forward or contact us via the website.

AC30 – Undefined accident offences

This is an unusual offence code and does not get used by the police or DVLA very often.

The DVLA offence code AC30 is associated with undefined accident offences for which you can receive a 4-9 point endorsement on your driving licence.

If you have this endorsement on your licence we will need to talk to you to give you advice on the best way forward. We will need to understand more about what’s happened Contact Us.

Disqualified Driver

Code Offence Penalty points
BA10  Driving while disqualified by order of court  6
BA30  Attempting to drive while disqualified by order of court  6

Offence codes BA10 & BA30 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

BA10 – Driving while disqualified by order of court

If you are found to have been driving while disqualified, this is an arrestable offence. Punishments vary, but prison sentences are an option. Otherwise, you can expect either community service or the imposition of a curfew order, along with a fine and an extension of the period for which you are disqualified from driving.

Court guidelines indicate that the minimum punishment should be a fine and further disqualification, although the latter can be avoided should there have been exceptional circumstances surrounding the offence. There will also be a six point endorsement of your driving licence.

Driving while disqualified by order of court and Patterson Law

The court regards this offence as a flagrant disregard of an order of the court – they take it personally. However, with good mitigation you can normally persuade them to give you a fine or community based sentence.

If you have been caught driving on a motoring ban then we need to speak to you about the best way forward. We need to understand the circumstances of the offence in order that we can give you advice on the best approach to dealing with this serious road traffic offence.

You are likely to be on bail, so you need to act fast. Bear in mind we are specialists in motoring offence law and we do not offer legal aid services. We work on behalf of our clients on a private fee paying basis and wherever possible we try and agree a fixed fee in advance.

BA30 – Attempting to drive while disqualified by order of court

Closely related to the BA10 offence – driving while disqualified – the DVLA code BA30 is associated with the offence of attempting to drive while disqualified by order of court – albeit with a fairly obvious distinction. The BA30 offence will lead to a six point endorsement on your driving licence and can also lead to fines, community sentences and even prison in some cases.

This is an unusual offence and does not get charged very often. An attempt to commit an offence has to be more than merely preparatory. You therefore have to take steps to actually drive the car before you can be found guilty.

Careless Driving

Code Offence Penalty points
CD10  Driving without due care and attention  3-9
CD20  Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users  3-9
CD30  Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users  3-9


Offence codes CD10, CD20 & CD30 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

CD10 – Driving without due care and attention

If you are found to have made a serious miscalculation while driving or have driven with a certain disregard for safety – such as not properly taking into account weather conditions or the level of traffic on the road – then you may be charged with driving without due care and attention which is associated with the DVLA endorsement code CD10

Examples of this type of offence might include undertaking or driving dangerously close to another vehicle, but it covers many more events than this. It should also be noted that the degree of care expected of a driver will vary depending on conditions.

The CD10 offence is effectively a step down from dangerous driving and the punishments are therefore somewhat less. However, you can be fined up to £5,000 and will have between three and nine penalty points applied to your driving licence.

The police will often offer a driver improvement course in minor matters, but more serious offences are charged to court.

See here for more information about this offence.

We are often able to persuade the police not to issue proceedings for this offence. If you want help, call us for a free chat on 01626 359800 or contact us via the website.

More about driving without due care and attention

Driving without Due Care FAQ’s

CD20 – Driving without reasonable consideration for other road users

If you are found to have been driving without reasonable consideration for other road users you will have 3-9 penalty points applied to your driving licence and will receive at least a £60 fine. The points will remain on your licence for four years from the date of the offence and could lead to your being banned from driving if you pick up 12 points or more within a three-year period. The DVLA code for this offence is CD20.

This offence tends to be more about inconsiderate driving rather than lapses in concentration or errors of judgement – for example, tailgating, slamming on brakes or cutting up another driver.

These are serious matters and the risk of a discretionary ban is often higher than for driving without due care and attention.

If you have been accused then contact us via the ask a free question page or call for a chat.

CD30 – Driving without due care and attention or without reasonable consideration for other road users

The DVLA’s CD30 offence is effectively a combination of two others in the same category, namely driving without due care and attention (CD10) and driving without reasonable consideration for other road users (CD20). As with those offences, it comes with a 3-9 point penalty which will remain on your licence for four years. It can also lead to a driving ban in combination with other offences via the totting up process.

You can contact us via our website or call for a free initial chat on 01626 359800 if you have been accused.

Code Offence Penalty points
CD40  Causing death through careless driving when unfit through drink  3-11
CD50  Causing death by careless driving when unfit through drugs  3-11
CD60  Causing death by careless driving with alcohol level above the limit  3-11
CD70  Causing death by careless driving then failing to supply a specimen for analysis  3-11


Offence codes CD40, CD50, CD60 & CD70 must stay on a driving licence for eleven years from date of conviction.

CD40 – Causing death through careless driving when unfit through drink

One of a more serious level of careless driving offences, causing death through careless driving when unfit through drink is identified by the DVLA offence code CD40. If you are found guilty of this offence, you will receive an obligatory driving ban of at least two years and 3-11 penalty points. On top of this, you could be given a 14-year prison sentence and there is no maximum fine. The fine amount will be decided based on your means and the circumstances surrounding the offence.

If you have been accused of this offence, you will need urgent help. Contact us via the website or call for a free chat on 01626 359800 if you need help from our specialist critical incident team.

CD50 – Causing death by careless driving when unfit through drugs

Causing death by careless driving when unfit through drugs – DVLA offence code CD50 – is one of the most serious of the careless driving category of offences. The offence brings an obligatory two-year driving ban and also 3-11 points on your driving licence.

On top of this, a fine is likely to be imposed and there is no upper limit on this – it will depend on personal circumstances and the specific nature of the offence. The court can also consider a custodial sentence of up to 14 years.

Contact us via the website if you have been charged or call for an urgent chat on 01626 359800.

CD60 – Causing death by careless driving with alcohol level above the limit

If you are found to have committed the CD60 offence – causing death by careless driving with alcohol level above the limit – then you will receive 3-11 points which will remain on your licence for 11 years.

On top of this, you can expect an obligatory two-year ban and then a fine and/or prison sentence can also be imposed. There is no maximum fine – the amount will be based on personal wherewithal and the nature of the offence – while the prison sentence could be up to 14 years.

This is clearly a very serious allegation and if you are found guilty at court you will be at risk of a custodial sentence (possibly for a few years) and also a very lengthy driving ban. You need to talk to an expert motoring solicitor as a matter of urgency. We can help. We have a critical incident team who are dealing with these sorts of allegations on a daily basis.

Call for an urgent chat on 01626 359800 or contact us via the website for some initial free advice.

CD70 – Causing death by careless driving then failing to supply a specimen for analysis

The DVLA code CD70 is associated with the motoring offence of causing death by careless driving then failing to supply a specimen for analysis. One of the most serious of the careless driving category of offences, it will lead to 3-11 points being applied to your driving licence which will remain for 11 years.

On top of this, the court has the ability to levy a fine for which there is no upper limit and a custodial sentence of up to 14 years is also a possibility. A minimum two-year driving ban is obligatory.

The police have a right to know in most circumstances whether you have been drink driving. The police will routinely check a driver’s breath for alcohol after they have committed a suspected road traffic offence and they normally have a right to do so.

Contact us if you have been accused

Code Offence Penalty points
CD80  Causing death by careless, or inconsiderate, driving  3-11
CD90  Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers  3-11

Offence codes CD80 and CD90 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of conviction.

CD80 – Causing death by careless, or inconsiderate, driving

While the maximum sentence for the CD80 offence has been set at five years’ imprisonment, if there are aggravating factors, it can actually end up as more. Different degrees of carelessness give rise to three levels of seriousness with the highest falling not far short of dangerous driving.

If the level of carelessness is deemed to have been low, a prison sentence will most likely not be imposed, although a fine is not likely to be appropriate either, in which case a community order may be handed out.

In addition to this, 3-11 penalty points will be added to the driver’s licence and an obligatory one-year driving ban will be imposed.

Causing death by careless or inconsiderate driving and Patterson Law

If you have been accused of this offence, you need to speak to the team at Patterson Law as a matter of urgency. We can help you and we deal with similar cases on behalf of clients on a regular basis. If you want a free initial chat, call us on 01626 359800 or contact us via the website and we will get back to you urgently.

We appreciate this is a difficult time and you may not want to talk about this matter, but if you have been accused then you need urgent help. Do not do a police interview on your own. This is the kind of allegation which can change your life if you do not defend yourself or get proper help with your mitigation.

CD90 – Causing death by driving: unlicensed, disqualified or uninsured drivers

The CD90 driving offence is unrelated to the standard of driving. The person is considered culpable simply through driving when not entitled to do so. The maximum custodial sentence is two years and if this is not applied, a community service order is usually imposed, rather than a fine.

The punishment will be greater where the driver was driving while disqualified rather than uninsured as there is greater culpability. Aggravating factors relate to the decision to drive, rather than the standard of driving. The offence also demands a mandatory 12-month ban and a 3-11 point driving licence endorsement.

This is a very serious allegation. The essence of the case will be that you should not have been driving in the first place as you did not have the necessary documents or entitlements.

If you have been accused of this offence then contact us here at Patterson Law and we will be able to help you. We can provide free initial advice if you call 01626 359800.

This is an unsual offence and you need expert help to try and avoid very serious consequences if convicted.

Construction and Use Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
CU10  Using a vehicle with defective brakes  3
CU20  Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of use of unsuitable vehicle or using a vehicle with parts or accessories (excluding brakes, steering or tyres) in a dangerous condition  3
CU30  Using a vehicle with defective tyre(s)  3
CU40  Using a vehicle with defective steering  3
CU50  Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of load or passengers  3
CU80  Using a mobile phone while driving a motor vehicle  3

Offence codes CU10, CU20, CU30, CU40, CU50 & CU80 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

CU10 – Using a vehicle with defective brakes

One of the ‘construction and use’ category of motoring offences, using a vehicle with defective brakes has the DVLA offence code CU10. It brings three penalty points and a £60 fine as a minimum, usually more.

CU10 offences have been on the rise, which may be down to people cutting corners when it comes to car maintenance. Clearly, this is dangerous, which is why this offence exists. If your brakes are defective, you can be charged, no matter what vehicle you drive.

There are ways to avoid the penalty points and if you want to know how then get in touch. We are often able to help clients avoid penalty points and fines when it is accepted that they were not and could not have been aware of the defect.

You need expert motoring solicitors to act on your behalf to stand a realistic chance of getting the right result in these matters. We help many people in similar circumstances around the country every day.

If you have been accused of driving with defective brakes then contact us via the website or call us on 01626 359800. Tell us more about what’s happened and we will give you some initial free advice about the best way forward.

CU20 – Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of use of unsuitable vehicle

CU20 is one of a number of ‘construction and use’ offences. It applies when a person has been driving a vehicle which is unsuitable for the roads for reasons other than the brakes, steering or tyres, for which there are separate offence codes. If you are charged with this offence, you will have three penalty points applied to your licence which will remain for four years. Fines start at £60 and can include court costs.

At Patterson Law, we are often able to help clients just like you avoid the risk of a driving ban or penalty points for this offence. There are circumstances where we can persuade the Magistrates that it would not be fair to give you any points for this offence.

If you want to talk to us about whether we can help then contact us via our website or call for a free chat on 01626 359800.

CU30 – Using a vehicle with defective tyre(s)

If the police suggest that you have driven a motor vehicle and one or all of the tyres are defective, then this is a road traffic offence and it carries three penalty points and a fine. If you get caught driving with one defective tyre the punishment is normally a £60 fixed penalty and three penalty points. If multiple tyres are defective, then you will normally be summonsed to court.

If a number of the tyres are defective, then you would not normally get penalty points for each and every tyre. The court can make an exception to this rule and give you penalty points in relation to each and every offence but this is unusual. The court would have to be very upset with you in order to deviate from this rule.

Defective tyre offences normally relate to the tyre being under or over inflated; lacking in tread; or damaged and bulging.

We have had considerable success over recent years using a particular rule under the Road Traffic Offenders Act 1988 to avoid penalty points in relation to defective tyre cases, where we have been able to argue that our clients would not have been aware of the defects.

It is especially the case when the vehicle in question does not belong to the person who was actually driving it at the time. We can also use this argument with considerable effect if the problem with the tyre was not obvious. We often represent people who say that the tyre has deflated during the course of the journey in question or that the defect to the tyre has occurred during the journey, for example, by clipping a kerb.

If you have been accused of driving a vehicle with a defective tyre and you want help, then please contact us or call in on 01626 359800 and we will do a free advice call with you.

CU40 – Using a vehicle with defective steering

It is an offence to use a vehicle with defective steering as major safety issues arise as a consequence. The offence is identified by the DVLA code CU40 and brings a three-point penalty which will remain on the person’s driving licence for four years. It is one of a number of construction and use driving offences, many of which relate to the condition of the vehicle. However, there are different codes for other vehicle components, such as the brakes and tyres.

It is an unusual offence and not charged very often. You may be able to avoid the points with our help if you did not know about the defect and if the defect was not obvious at the time of driving.

Contact us via our website or call us if you have been accused of this offence and the team at Patterson Law will be happy to assist.

CU50 – Causing or likely to cause danger by reason of load or passengers

The police will often use this charge in relation to cases where a car has been overloaded or, for example, when children are not being carried in an appropriate child safety seat.

As you can imagine, the courts take these matters very seriously and will impose three points or a discretionary ban.

If you have been accused and you want/need help then contact us via our website or call for a free chat on 01626 359800 and we will be happy to assist you further.

More about driving dangerous vehicles

Dangerous Vehicle Offence FAQ’s

CU80 – Using a mobile phone while driving a motor vehicle

These offences both carry the risk of three penalty points or a discretionary ban from driving as well as a fine of up to £1,000 and court costs if convicted.

We are defending people through England and Wales on a daily basis in relation to these matters and we have an extremely good success rate.

If you want/need our help then contact us via our website or call us.

For more information about these specific motoring offences ask us a free question….

More about mobile phone CU80 offences

Using Mobile Phone While Driving Offence FAQ’s

Reckless/Dangerous Driving

Code Offence Penalty points
DD40  Dangerous driving  3-11
DD60  Manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving a vehicle  3-11
DD80  Causing death by dangerous driving  3-11
DD90  Furious driving  3-9

Offence codes DD40, DD60 & DD80 & DD90 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of conviction.

DD40 – Dangerous Driving

It goes without saying that this is a very serious allegation. Dangerous driving allegations can be sent to the Crown Court for trial if the Magistrates feel their powers are not great enough in relation to sentencing you, if convicted. You can ask for a Crown Court trial if you want to defend yourself in front of a jury.

If you have been accused of this offence you will be at risk of a minimum 12-month ban with a mandatory extended retest before you can drive again.

See here for more information about dangerous driving offences or contact us via the website if you have been accused. You can also call for free initial advice on 01626 359800.

We are specialist motoring solicitors, dealing with these offences every day of the week and we can help. If you need to be able to drive and you have been accused, get in touch.

More about dangerous driving offences

Dangerous Driving Offence FAQ’s

DD60 – Manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving a vehicle

The DVLA offence code DD60 relates to manslaughter or culpable homicide while driving a vehicle. It brings 3-11 penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years. However, clearly this is a very serious offence which is likely to bring further punishment beyond mere penalty points.

This is obviously an extremely serious allegation and you are going to need help if you have been accused. If you want further information then contact us via the website or call for a chat on 01626 359800. We can talk you through the allegation and explain the consequences of any conviction.

DD80 – Causing death by dangerous driving

Causing death by dangerous driving – DVLA offence code DD80 – brings 3-11 penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years. However, as such a serious offence, further punishment is likely. The minimum is a two-year driving ban and custodial sentences of up to 14 years can be imposed.

There are three levels of offence which are defined by the standard of driving with level one being the most serious. A level one offence would involve the driver ignoring the rules of the road with disregard for the resultant danger and would usually involve either prolonged, persistent or deliberate bad driving or consumption of a large amount of drink or drugs. A level one offence would typically see a sentencing range of 7-14 years custody.

Causing death by dangerous driving and Patterson Law

A very serious motoring allegation. We deal with these sorts of matters on a regular basis. This allegation is simply a dangerous driving charge which leads to someone dying as a result of the motoring accident. We understand that if charged you will be in turmoil. We can help.

You are going to be at risk of a lengthy prison sentence if convicted so you do need help from experts who are used to dealing with such serious charges. We have a specialist critical incident team who deal with similar cases every day of the week and who are specially trained.

Call in for urgent advice if accused on 01626 359800 or contact us via the website.

DD90 – Furious driving

Furious driving is associated with the DVLA code DD90. The offence brings 3-9 penalty points and must stay on the driver’s licence for four years from the date of the offence. Furious driving is one of the dangerous driving category of offences. It is a serious offence which can lead to a driving ban.

This is a very unusual allegation and is not normally an offence that the police charge. You are more likely to be charged with dangerous driving.

If you have been charged with this or a similar offence then contact us via this link

Drink or Drugs

Code Offence Penalty points
DR10  Driving or attempting to drive with alcohol level above limit  3-11
DR20  Driving or attempting to drive while unfit through drink  3-11
DR30  Driving or attempting to drive then failing to supply a specimen for analysis  3-11


Offence codes DR10, DR20 & DR30 must stay on a driving licence for eleven years from date of conviction.

DR10 – Driving or attempting to drive with alcohol level above limit

Drink and drug related driving offences remain on your driving licence for 11 years. The DR10 offence – driving or attempting to drive with alcohol level above limit – brings 3-11 points.

The legal limit is currently 35 micrograms of alcohol per 100ml of breath or 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100ml of blood. In both cases you can expect a £5,000 fine and up to six months in prison as well as a driving ban lasting between 12 and 36 months. If you have committed two drink driving offences within 10 years, the minimum ban increases to three years.

We can help. See here for more information about the offence, contact us via the website for initial advice, or call us for a free chat.

More about drinking and driving offences

Drink Drive offence FAQ’s

DR20 – Driving or attempting to drive while unfit through drink

The DR20 offence – driving or attempting to drive while unfit through drink – brings 3-11 penalty points which remain on the person’s licence for 11 years. The penalties are the same as for the DR10 offence, being a £5,000 fine and up to six months in prison as well as a driving ban of between 12 and 36 months.

The distinction between the two offences is that you can be prosecuted for this one without a specimen having been taken. This means the case must revolve around the testimony of a doctor or police officer.

Contact us via the website to request a free advice call if you have been accused or call us today.

DR30 – Driving or attempting to drive then failing to supply a specimen for analysis

The DVLA offence code DR30 relates to failure to supply specimens of breath, blood or urine when asked by the police. The offence brings 3-11 penalty points which will remain on the licence for 11 years, as well as a £5,000 fine, up to six months in prison and a ban of between one and three years. It is often linked with other drink or drug-related offences for obvious reasons.

This offence relates to a situation when you are asked to supply a specimen of breath after a suspected drinking driving offence.

Contact us via the website or call for a free chat if you need/want our help.

Code Offence Penalty points
DR40  In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit  10
DR50  In charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink  10
DR60  Failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive  10
DR70  Failing to provide specimen for breath test  4


Offence codes DR40, DR50, DR60 & DR70 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

DR40 – In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit

The lesser charge of being in charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit has much in common with driving with excess alcohol except that the person has not actually driven. The legal limit is 80 milligrams of alcohol per 100ml of blood or 35 micrograms per 100ml of breath.

The penalty is 10 points on the person’s driving licence, which will remain for four years, as well as a £2,500 fine, up to three months in prison and potentially a driving ban of between 12 and 36 months.

In charge of a vehicle while alcohol level above limit and Patterson Law

You have a defence to being in charge over the drink driving limit if you can show that there was no likelihood of your driving whilst over the limit.

You will normally need expert evidence from a pharmacologist to support this argument. You will have to show the court that at the time you would have driven (perhaps the next day) you would have been back under the limit. This is often not a matter of common sense.

If you have been accused you will need help in your defence to avoid the risk of a discretionary ban. Contact us for a free discussion about the best way forward.

DR50 – In charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink

One of the drink driving offences, to be charged with being in charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink will often mean that you were not stopped while driving and did not supply a specimen, but that the police had reason to believe you had been drinking and were in charge of a vehicle.

10 penalty points will be added to your licence for this offence and you could also get up to three months in prison, a £2,500 fine as well as a driving ban of between 12 and 36 months.

In charge of a vehicle while unfit through drink and Patterson Law

The police/prosecution tend to charge this offence when you don’t supply a specimen of breath for analysis and they suspect that you have a reasonable excuse for not being able to do so.

The punishment is the same as for driving whilst over the limit but the CPS don’t have to prove that you were over the limit – they simply have to prove that your driving was affected by drink or drugs i.e. “under the influence”.

The prosecution will normally suggest that your driving was not good enough. For example, weaving across lanes or clipping the kerb.

If you have been accused of this, it is a serious offence.

DR60 – Failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive

A DR60 offence – failure to provide a specimen for analysis in circumstances other than driving or attempting to drive – is seen as a serious offence by the courts. The police may request a specimen of breath, blood or urine and the charge can relate to any of these.

The offence brings a 10-point penalty which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years. The courts can also impose a driving ban, fine and community order if this is deemed appropriate.

Contact us via the website or call for a free chat if you are worried about this offence or you have been accused and we can talk you through the best way forward.

DR70 – Failing to provide specimen for breath test

The DR70 offence is deemed to have been committed when a person fails or refuses to take a roadside breath test when asked to do so by a police officer. In this instance, the person will have been either driving or attempting to drive.

The maximum penalty is a driving ban and a fine of up to £1,000 can also be imposed. The minimum penalty is four points added to the person’s driving licence which will remain for four years.

Failing to provide specimen for breath test and Patterson Law

The courts and police often get confused about this offence. It relates to failing to provide a specimen for analysis at the roadside, so it is not the same as failing to provide a specimen for analysis at the police station.

If the court or prosecution get confused as to the nature of this offence you will get at least a 12 month driving ban. We had to take a case to the Crown Court once where a client had been convicted of this offence and received a minimum 12-month ban. He was represented by purported road traffic offences lawyers who clearly did not understand the law.

It took a while to set the record straight and get the driving ban lifted, but it shows that you cannot take for granted that the people dealing with a case like this will know what they are doing – including the prosecution and the Court staff.

Code Offence Penalty points
DR80  Driving or attempting to drive when unfit through drugs  3-11


Offence code DR80 must stay on a driving licence for eleven years from date of conviction.

DR80 – Driving or attempting to drive when unfit through drugs

The DVLA code DR80 relates to a serious offence which is deemed to have taken place when a person has driven or attempted to drive a vehicle while impaired by drugs. The exact punishment will vary depending on a number of factors including the level of impairment as well as aggravating and mitigating factors.

The minimum punishment is 3-11 penalty points, but disqualification is likely and bans are typically between one and three years. The maximum fine that can be imposed is £5,000 and the courts are also able to hand out community orders and prison sentences of up to six months.

Driving or attempting to drive when unfit through drugs and Patterson Law

The police will normally suggest that the standard of your driving was affected by the consumption of illegal or even prescription drugs – for example drugs that make you drowsy.

We deal with many similar allegations and they have to be handled with care. In order to prove this allegation the police will have to take a blood or urine sample from you. The police often make mistakes when it comes to dealing with the taking of samples at the police station.

If you want/need help then contact us and we will do a free initial advice call with you and give you advice on the best way forward.

Code Offence Penalty points
DR90  In charge of a vehicle when unfit through drugs  10

Offence code DR90 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

DR90 – In charge of a vehicle when unfit through drugs

The DR90 offence comes into effect when a person is in charge of a vehicle when unfit through drugs, but has not actually driven. The minimum penalty is 10 penalty points which will remain on the person’s licence for four years. A driving ban is also likely and will be for between 12 and 36 months. On top of that, a £5,000 fine can be imposed as well as up to six months’ imprisonment.

It’s an unusual allegation and if you have been convicted you will need specialist help to get the right result. The police have to prove beyond reasonable doubt that your ability to drive was affected by your being under the influence of drugs.

Insurance Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
IN10  Using a vehicle uninsured against third party risks  6-8

Offence code IN10 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

IN10 – Using a vehicle uninsured against third party risks.

The DVLA code IN10 refers to the offence of driving a vehicle without compulsory third party insurance. It is a criminal offence for which the maximum penalty is a 12-month driving ban as well as a fine.

In addition to this, the person will be given six to eight penalty points which will remain on their licence for four years. Police officers also have the power to seize vehicles that have been driven without insurance if certain conditions apply.

Using a vehicle uninsured against third party risks and Patterson Law

This is one of the most common offences that we deal with and we are often able to get these matters dropped. The police are not clear on the law in relation to insurance contracts and often get confused about the overlap between road traffic offence and your contractual relationship with the insurance company.

If we get involved at the police station stage we are often able to get matters dropped by persuading the police that our client was actually insured or that there is no public interest in pursuing the matter further.

We are often able to avoid penalty points by making special reasons arguments. This is not just mitigation.

We are dealing with many similar arguments every week and have extremely good success rates in getting these serious matters withdrawn by the police or the prosecution at court.

Most lawyers won’t try to get these matters dropped and will advise a guilty plea and simple mitigation. This is not enough. You have to list the case for special reason and attend and give evidence on oath.

You will still get the points unless you make a special reasons argument. See here for more information on this offence.

These offences can be devastating for new driver who cannot get six or more points in their first two years after passing their test.

More about no insurance offences

Driving without & permitting no insurance FAQ’s

If you are in trouble for driving without insurance, contact us via the website or call in for a free chat.

Licence Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
LC20  Driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence  3-6
LC30  Driving after making a false declaration about fitness when applying for a licence  3-6
LC40  Driving a vehicle having failed to notify a disability  3-6
LC50  Driving after a licence has been revoked or refused on medical grounds  3-6

Offence codes LC20, LC30, LC40 & LC50 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

LC20 – Driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence

Any driver must have a valid driving licence which authorises them to drive the class of vehicle in question. If this is not the case, the person will be deemed to have committed an LC20 offence – driving otherwise than in accordance with a licence. The validity of a driving licence depends on it being used in accordance with the conditions of issue and it is worth noting that licences issued at different times have covered different vehicles.

This offence brings three to six penalty points which will remain on the person’s driving licence for four years. There is also the option for a court to disqualify the driver.

If you permit another person to drive otherwise than in accordance with a licence, this then becomes an LC24 offence.

Driving not in accordance with a licence and Patterson Law

This sounds like a straight forward allegation. It’s not.

There are many different ways that you can commit the offence. Some carry penalty points, some don’t.

You have to be careful as the Court will often make a mistake and impose points for this offence when they should not.

Strangely, you get points for this offence when you don’t have a licence or entitlement to drive. You don’t get points if you have an entitlement to drive and your licence is subject to an administration revocation – for example because you have not sent your licence to the DVLA for points to be endorsed.

It’s a complicated little offence. If you have been accused, we would like to talk to you. We can often get these matters withdrawn or at least avoid the points.

LC30 – Driving after making a false declaration about fitness when applying for a licence

The DVLA code LC30 relates to the offence of driving after making a false declaration about fitness when applying for a licence. As you might expect, this is basically a problem with the initial driving licence application and the accuracy of the information which was provided at that time.

The LC30 offence brings three to six penalty points which will remain on the person’s driving licence for four years.

A very uncommon offence. To be convicted the police would have to show that you misled the DVLA regarding your health and fitness to drive when you applied for a licence.

LC40 – Driving a vehicle having failed to notify a disability


Driving a vehicle having failed to notify a disability – DVLA code LC40 – falls into the category of driving licence offences. It means that the person has failed to state a known disability which should have been disclosed when applying for their driving licence. The offence carries a three to six point penalty which will remain on the person’s licence for four years from the date of the offence.

LC50 – Driving after a licence has been revoked or refused on medical grounds

A driving licence application can be rejected on medical grounds and licences can also be revoked on the same basis. This gives rise to the LC50 offence which you will have committed if you drive when your licence has been revoked or refused for medical reasons. The offence brings three to six penalty points which will remain on the person’s driving licence for four years.

More about driving licence offences

No Driving Licence Offence FAQ’s

Miscellaneous Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
MS10  Leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position  3
MS20  Unlawful pillion riding  3
MS30  Play street offences  2
MS50  Motor racing on the highway  3-11
MS60  Offences not covered by other codes  As Appropriate
MS70  Driving with uncorrected defective eyesight  3
MS80  Refusing to submit to an eyesight test  3
MS90  Failure to give information as to identity of driver etc  6

Offence codes MS10, MS20, MS30, MS40, MS50, MS60, MS70, MS80 & MS90 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

MS10 – Leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position

One of the miscellaneous category of offences, the DVLA code MS10 refers to leaving a vehicle in a dangerous position. It will lead to three penalty points being added to your driving licence which will remain for four years.

Examples would include breaking down and leaving your car in the road just over a hump-backed bridge or just after a blind bend.

Contact us if you have been accused or call in for a free initial chat.

MS20 – Unlawful pillion riding

The DVLA code MS20 relates to the use of the pillion seat on a motorcycle. It is legal to carry one passenger on the pillion seat provided they can sit astride it with their feet on foot rests. Should the pillion be too small or where the motorcycle doesn’t actually have a pillion, an offence will be deemed to have been committed.

Typically, the rider is the one who is prosecuted. The offence brings a three point penalty which will remain on the driving licence for four years. A fine of up to £1,000 may also be imposed and there is also the option to disqualify the person from driving.

MS30 – Play street offences


Very unusual offence. If you have been accused ask a free question and tell us more about what the police have alleged.

MS50 – Motor racing on the highway

It is an offence to race on public roads. The DVLA code MS50 relates to motor racing on the highway and brings a three to eleven point penalty which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years. It is also possible for a court to order a driving ban.

Motor racing on the highway and Patterson Law

We have dealt with a large number of these allegations over recent years – especially around the Birmingham and Manchester area. The police have been clamping down on what they perceive to be organised street racing and have CCTV footage of organised events with hundreds of spectators lining the roads.

These are serious allegations and carry a risk of a ban. We can help and have had very good success defending these allegations.

MS60 – Offences not covered by other codes

Where an offence is not covered by any other DVLA code, it is considered an MS60. Because this covers a range of possible events, the punishments are not fixed, so the penalty points handed out will vary. Depending on the nature of the offence, it may also bring a fine.

If the police have suggested that they want to endorse your licence with this code then contact us.

MS70 – Driving with uncorrected defective eyesight

It is a legal requirement for any driver to be able to read a car number plate from 20.5 metres away. If corrective eyewear is needed in order to be able to do this, it must be worn. It doesn’t matter whether that means glasses or contact lenses so long as the person can see clearly.

The DVLA must also be notified of certain conditions, including cataracts, glaucoma and double vision and it is the driver’s responsibility to have their eyesight tested regularly to ensure they are driving legally.

Any person found to have been driving with uncorrected defective eyesight will be deemed to have committed the MS70 offence. This offence will typically bring three penalty points and a fine, although a person can also be disqualified from driving in some circumstances.

If your driving licence stipulates that you must wear glasses whilst driving and you get caught not wearing them, you are committing an offence. This is an unusual offence but you will be charged if the police catch you driving without your glasses on.

MS80 – Refusing to submit to an eyesight test

As it is an offence to drive with uncorrected defective eyesight, a person may be required to submit to an eye test in order to prove the standard of their vision. If an officer suggests that your eyesight may be defective, you have to comply with the request. A refusal to do so means the person in question will be deemed to have committed the DVLA’s MS80 offence, for which there is a three point penalty.

Get in touch if you need some help with this allegation.

MS90 – Failure to give information as to identity of driver

A driver’s identity must be supplied following an accident and where the police request such information with regards to an offence. The 1988 Road Traffic Act states that the owner of a vehicle must give information as to the identity of the driver of the vehicle at the time of any alleged offence.

The offence used to bring three penalty points, but this has now been increased to six, which means you could potentially receive more points for failing to disclose the identity of a driver than the person themselves would receive for the offence in question. Fines of up to £1,000 can also be handed out.

Failing to provide driver identity and Patterson Law

We represent more people in relation to this offence than perhaps any other. We are regarded as national experts and we get four out of five of these allegations dropped without the need for a trial and without the need for our clients to attend court. See here for more information about the MS90 failing to name offence.

To be genuinely good at defending a failing to name charge you have to know section 172 RTA 1988 inside out and back to front. We do. It’s a very complicated section of the Road Traffic Act and there is lots of case law. Most of which is not relevant anymore. If you carry out research on the internet, you will read lots of nonsense about human rights infringements that is no longer relevant and which will simply antagonise the court.

It’s a serious offence and carries a heavy clout of 6 points and a hefty fine if convicted.

More about Section 172 driver identity offences

Failing to provide driver identity offence FAQ’s

Motorway Offences

Code Offence Penalty points
MW10  Contravention of special roads regulations (excluding speed limits)  3

Offence code MW10 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

MW10 – Contravention of special roads regulations (excluding speed limits)

The MW10 code covers motorway offences and typically brings three points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years. The code covers a number of offences, such as driving passenger vehicles in the far side lane and improper use of the hard shoulder but many varying offences are included.

If you have been accused of an MW10 offence then get in touch and we will be happy to help. It’s an unusual code that the police don’t use very often. Give us a call to discuss further.

Pedestrian Crossings

Code Offence Penalty points
PC10  Undefined contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations  3
PC20  Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with moving vehicle  3
PC30  Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with stationary vehicle  3

Offence codes PC10, PC20 & PC30 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

PC10 – Undefined contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations

Pedestrian crossing violations will typically bring three penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years.

PC10 is a very unusual offence code. If you have a fixed penalty ticket with this code on it and you want some help we are going to have to talk to you to understand more about what happened.

PC20 – Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with moving vehicle

Drivers are obliged to give way to any pedestrian who has stepped onto a crossing. In essence, the pedestrian has right of way.

If you contravene a pedestrian crossing on or in a motoring vehicle then you face a three point penalty or a discretionary ban, fines and court costs. These can be serious allegations if someone was trying to cross at the time.

PC30 – Contravention of pedestrian crossing regulations with stationary vehicle

Pedestrian crossings must be kept clear. It is therefore an offence to park on the zigzag lines on either side of the crossing and if you do, you are likely to receive three penalty points which will remain on your licence for four years, as well as a fine and perhaps court costs.

This offence would normally involve a suggestion that you parked on a pedestrian crossing. If you want our help in relation to this matter then contact us

Speed Limits

Code Offence Penalty points
SP10  Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits  3-6
SP20  Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles)  3-6
SP30  Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road  3-6
SP40  Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit  3-6
SP50  Exceeding speed limit on a motorway  3-6

Offence codes SP10, SP20, SP30, SP40 & SP50 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

SP10 – Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits

The speed limits for goods vehicles sometimes differ from those stated on signs. For example, on a single carriageway, a goods vehicle under 7.5 tonnes should not exceed 50mph, whereas the limit would be 60mph for cars. On the same road, a goods vehicle weighing over 7.5 tonnes should not exceed 40mph. Motor homes and motor caravans can also be classed as goods vehicles in certain circumstances.

Exceeding goods vehicle speed limits and Patterson Law

If you are accused of breaching the speed limit for your vehicle on a specific road then we can help you. You will be at risk of 3-6 penalty points or a discretionary ban. You will also be at risk of fines and court costs if convicted.

If you are a professional driver and you have been accused of this offence then give us a call for a free chat.

SP20 – Exceeding speed limit for type of vehicle (excluding goods or passenger vehicles)

Different vehicles have different speed limits. Occasionally the police will accuse people driving tractors or track laying vehicles of speeding, which is signified by the DVLA code SP20.

This is an unusual offence but will bring three to six penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years.

If you have been charged with this and need help, contact us via the website or call us for a chat.

SP30 – Exceeding statutory speed limit on a public road

If you are caught exceeding the speed limit by a police officer or speed gun, you are likely to be issued with a £60 fine and three penalty points which will remain on your licence for four years. You could also receive a court summons and whether this happens or not will often depend on the speed you were doing.

Speed limits vary according to the vehicle you are driving, but for cars the national speed limits are 30mph in built-up areas, 60mph on single carriageways and 70mph on dual carriageways and motorways.

If you have been charged with an SP30 offence and wish to challenge it, get in touch with us via the website or phone us.

SP40 – Exceeding passenger vehicle speed limit

Passenger vehicles over a certain size are subject to different speed limits than those for cars. If you are found to have been speeding in such a vehicle, you will be deemed to have committed an SP40 offence for which you are likely to receive between three and six penalty points which will remain on your licence for four years.

If you are a professional driver and you drive passenger vehicles, you need to take an allegation of this nature seriously. It could affect your employment. These offences can carry a discretionary ban if you are convicted.

If you need help or want to have a free initial chat then call us or contact us via the ‘ask a free question‘ page. We help lots of professional drivers and will be happy to assist you further if we can.

SP50 – Exceeding speed limit on a motorway

You must not exceed the speed limit for the type of road and for your type of vehicle. On a motorway, the limit is 70mph for cars and for most other vehicles and 60mph for cars towing caravans as well as for goods vehicles over 7.5 tonnes.

SP50 is the DVLA offence code if you get accused speeding on a motorway and for this you will receive 3-6 penalty points, although you could also be subject to a discretionary ban depending on how high the speed was. See our page on speeding offences if you want more general information.

If you have been accused and the speed is high or you already have too many points on your licence then contact us via the website or call for free advice.

More about speeding offences

Speeding FAQ’s

Traffic Direction and Signs

Code Offence Penalty points
TS10  Failing to comply with traffic light signals  3
TS20  Failing to comply with double white lines  3
TS30  Failing to comply with ‘Stop’ sign  3
TS40  Failing to comply with direction of a constable/warden  3
TS50  Failing to comply with traffic sign (excluding ‘stop’ signs, traffic lights or double white lines)  3
TS60  Failing to comply with a school crossing patrol sign  3
TS70  Undefined failure to comply with a traffic direction sign  3

Offence codes TS10, TS20, TS30, TS40, TS50, TS60 & TS70 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

TS10 – Failing to comply with traffic light signals

As a motorist, you are obliged to stop at traffic lights unless the light is green. The amber light indicates that a vehicle should stop unless it is already past the white stop line or where stopping there might cause an accident. When the light is red, you must always stop.

These days it is common for traffic light offences to involve photographic evidence and a notice of intended prosecution will normally lead to a fixed penalty notice. The standard penalty is three points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years as well as a fine.

If you have been charged with failing to comply with traffic light signals and feel that you have a reasonable defence, contact us via the website or phone us.

Traffic Light Offence FAQ’s

TS20 – Failing to comply with double white lines

Double white lines come in several different forms, with each indicating something subtly different. However, broadly speaking they are used to indicate to drivers that they should not cross into another lane. For example, they are used to prevent overtaking where visibility is restricted as well as to separate opposing traffic flows on steep hills amongst other things.

If you have been accused of contravening double white lines then you can contact us via the website or call us for initial advice. The offence carries three penalty points which will remain on your licence for four years and could render you liable for a ban via the totting up process. The court can also consider a discretionary ban if it’s a serious version of this offence.

TS30 – Failing to comply with ‘Stop’ sign

The police don’t often charge people with failing to comply with a stop sign. When they do, it carries three penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years or a discretionary ban.

TS40 – Failing to comply with direction of a constable/warden

In many circumstances, it is necessary for the police to deliver direction to drivers in order to keep the roads safe. It might be because of an accident or because of failed traffic lights or something like that. If you fail to comply, you can be charged with the DVLA’s TS40 offence, which is failing to comply with direction of a constable/warden. The offence brings three penalty points which will remain on your licence for four years.

If you have been charged with a TS40 offence, you can contact us via the website or call us.

TS50 – Failing to comply with traffic sign (excluding ‘stop’ signs, traffic lights or double white lines)

There are a number of different traffic signs which are not associated with their own offence codes but for which non-compliance could prove dangerous. They are covered by the TS50 code which brings three penalty points which will remain on the driver’s licence for four years.

If you need help having been accused of this offence, contact us via the website or call us.

TS60 – Failing to comply with a school crossing patrol sign

According to the Road Traffic Regulation Act 1984, councils are able to provide a school crossing patrol service. These patrols have the power to stop traffic in order that pedestrians may cross. You must stop when a school crossing patrol is displaying their stop sign.

If you fail to comply, you could receive three points on your licence, which will remain for four years. Fines of up to £1000 and disqualification are also possibilities. If you have been accused of this, feel free to get in touch via the website or call us.

TS70 – Undefined failure to comply with a traffic direction sign

The TS70 offence relates to undefined failures to comply with traffic direction signs. It is a very unusual offence but will bring three points which must remain on the driver’s licence for four years.

More about contravening traffic signs

Traffic Sign Law FAQ’s

If you have been accused of this, you can contact us via the website or call us today.

Special codes

Code Offence
TT99  To signify a disqualification under ‘totting-up’ procedure. If the total of penalty points reaches 12 or more within three years, the driver is liable to be disqualified

Offence code TT99 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of conviction.

TT99 – To signify a disqualification under ‘totting-up’ procedure

If you already have penalty points on your licence and are now facing prosecution for a further offence, you could be disqualified from driving under the ‘totting up’ procedure. Any driver who accumulates 12 points or more within a three year period could face a six month ban, although the period can be longer where the driver has previously been disqualified from driving.

The three year period is calculated from when the first offence was committed, not from when the points were added to the licence. The TT99 code must stay on a driving licence for four years from the date of conviction.

If you have exceeded 12 penalty points and are now facing a driving ban, get in touch with us to see whether a case can be made for retaining your licence. You can contact us via the website or call us.

More about totting up offences

Totting up points FAQ’s

Theft or Unauthorised Taking

Code Offence Penalty points
UT50  Aggravated taking of a vehicle  3-11

Offence codes UT50 must stay on a driving licence for four years from date of offence.

UT50 – Aggravated taking of a vehicle

If you are convicted of aggravated taking of a vehicle, you are likely to receive 3-11 penalty points and the UT50 endorsement will remain on your licence for four years.

The range in points reflects the fact that the exact nature of the offence can vary from using a friend or family member’s vehicle in their absence to stealing vehicles or taking them by force.

Aggravated taking of a vehicle is a serious offence. If you wish to speak to us about it, you can contact us via the website or call us.

Aiding, Abetting, Counseling or Procuring

Offences as coded, but with 0 changed to 2 eg LC10 becomes LC12.

Causing or Permitting

Offences as coded, but with 0 changed to 4 eg LC10 becomes LC14.

Inciting

Offences as coded, but with the end 0 changed to 6 eg DD40 becomes DD46.

Non-Endorsable Offences

Some offences are non-endorsable. A non-endorsable offence is an offence which courts do not endorse onto your paper counterpart. No penalty points are attributed to these offences but they carry a period of disqualification.

At the end of the disqualification (over 56 days) you will have to apply for a renewal licence together with the appropriate fee.

If you need advice about driving offence codes please click here to ASK US A FREE QUESTION and find out how we can help you.

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